How Can I Get a Gout Diagnosis?

Many people with sore toes, feet, or other joints find it difficult to get a clear diagnosis. Over the years, the gout symptoms forum has seen many people who are totally frustrated. I am not talking about people who refrain from visiting their doctor, who talk with their mates in the pub, and decide that a swollen foot must be gout. I'm referring to people who have consulted doctors, presented suspicions of gout, yet been told they can't have gout, for whatever reason. In my case, I was originally told by my family doctor (since retired) that I could not have gout, as swelling was in my ankle, not my big toe. Joint fluid analysis by a rheumatologist confirmed that I did have gout. It's a shame I had to endure 4 days in hospital to get that simple test, but at least I knew exactly what my problem was. I will summarize other old forum discussions about this issue, but I want to...
Read More

Who Wants Free Colchicine?

This is a repeat call for members in the US to take up the offer of free colchicine kindly donated by a recovering gout patient who no longer needs it, and kindly distributed by an American gout patient who wants to help you. The relevant information from previous discussions is: thanks to a compassionate goutie from Ireland. He gave me 8 packs with 20 pills of 1.0 mg Colchicine to be given away to a needy (without insurance) goutie here in the States. Each pill is individually sealed, has never been touched by a human hand, and ONE pill is almost as much as 2 US pills, being 0.6 mg. Rather than giving all 160 pills to just one goutie, I prefer that 4 get the benefit of 40 pills each. (WE are looking here at a total of ~$1350 if purchased.) If you think you qualify, please, ask Keith Taylor to send me your email address so that we may converse freely concerning...
Read More

Is Gout Help Worth Paying For?

I am mindful that gout sufferers do not get the help they deserve. I never understood it until I spent over 5 years learning what the right treatment should be, then fighting successive doctors until I found one that listened, understood, and helped me fix my gout. I seriously believe that the only way to manage gout is through a good relationship with a doctor who understands gout. But what do you do if you do not have that relationship, or cannot find that doctor? That is the essence of my gout support services. I seek ways to help you build that relationship with simple basic facts. I realize that gout that is complicated with other diseases or intolerance to gout medications is always going to be challenging. For that, you must consult a rheumatologist who has experience with similar cases. But "common or garden" gout is very easy to manage. Keep uric acid at 5mg/dL (0.30mmol/L), or below. For the first few months,...
Read More

Allopurinol Advice Needed

Allopurinol is great for gout, but only if the dose is right. Get it wrong, and the effect on uric acid level is useless, as this reader's father is finding out.Hello, i run into web site after helplessly trying to get some info about gout. My dad is visiting me here, and he is having one of his attacks. He is 72. I guess he was never diagnosed properly, and last 15 years he was given some non-steroid, anti-inflammatory medication. At the end he ended up in a hospital for a bleeding ulcer, and that was first time he was diagnosed with gout. That was last year in September. His gout was so bad, that he couldn?t walk. He was given injections for pain and inflammation. They put him on allopurinol 100 mg. he got better, but never 100%. When he came here, I looked through his lab tests. Back in September his uric acid was 516 umol/l. Average should...
Read More

Gout & Flying

There is truthfully very little to say about gout & flying - it is a non-issue. There is absolutely no connection between gout and flying, but there could be general health concerns that apply to everyone - not just gout patients. These concerns will be exacerbated by longer flights. Essentially, there are no specific changes that affect you during flight, but there may be secondary problems that make flying difficult for the gout patient. These are issues of mobility and hydration. Gout & Flying: Mobility Sitting still for hours is not unique to flying. Long journeys by most methods of transport involve the same immobility, as does many jobs. I cannot find any gout studies about the affects of immobility on gout, so I will write from my own experiences. I have found that long periods of sitting can make knee and ankle joints very stiff, making walking difficult. One advantage of air travel against driving is that, unless you are the pilot, you can...
Read More