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  • #3195
    earthmuzk
    Participant

    Gout and itching. I have been itching on my feet and heels for several months. Sometimes all over my body, feet and hands. Recently I had an extreme gout attack. During that time my itching went away and when the attack stopped, the itching came back. I have tried every cream made, including steroids, hydrocortisone and fungal. I am now convinced that the itching is a buildup of uric acid that is huge. I am 62 and for the last few years have been trying to lose wight by eating a high-protein diet. Now, I am trying to following a low protein gout diet, etc. I am beside myself with the itching tho. Just found out about the baking soda and will try that. Any other suggestions. I have tried Atarax, nerve therapy, etc. I think the solution is to rid my body of uric acid. How do I do this naturally?


    Gout and Itching Update

    This old topic still contains many interesting comments about gout and itching. But, you should differentiate between:

    You should search to see if there are any current discussions about general itching. Because this is closely related to numbness and tingling, 2 of the 3 unusual signs of gout. However, at the time of writing, there is a current discussion about itching from allopurinol rash.

    Allopurinol Hypersensitivity Rash photo
    How do you avoid Allopurinol Itching
    ?
    #2711
    choo
    Participant

    Uric Acid and Eczema + Gout

    I have both eczema and gout. Until recently I thought they were unrelated. I had taken allopurinol for a couple of months and it appeared that my gout was gone. When I then decided to stop taking allopurinol, my eczema slowly became more inflamed (redder and small bumps) over a 3 month period. After the 3 month period, my gout came back and on doctor’s orders, started to take the allopurinol again. The day after, the small bumps and the redness on the eczema areas reduced dramatically. From then on, I could correlate the time when the gout pain would appear and when the eczema would get worse and vice versa. Since then, there are other websites which talks about the relationship between uric acid and eczema.

    Since then, I have found that juicing fruits and vegetables with drinking lots of water helps to reduce the uric acid levels in my blood.

    #3989
    zip2play
    Participant

    That doesn't surprise me in the least. Uric acid as an end product of purine and nucleic acid  degradation is a defect in man's metabolism. Although gout is the most overwhelmingly OBVIOUS manifestation of the defect, it would be unreasonable to assume it is the ONLY one.

    There is good science implicating hyperuricemia in heart disease, primarily in men.

    I have seen some good theory relating it to back pain as well. In fact one man made a distinguished career out of curing “bad backs” with colchicine injections.

    I SUSPECT that UA is involved in many many arthritic diseases, not just the ones where joints are filled with crystals. After all, even in gout, the pain presents LONG before lasting crystallization becomes evident.

    Thus I have no doubt that one's eczema reacting favorably to allopurinol is more than coincidence.

    #4434
    charlie
    Participant

    I had terrible eczema too and its almost gone.

    I am on Allopurinol for 9 months now.

    Never thought it could be connected.

    #4440

    Though gout is typified by uric acid crystals forming in the joints where they cause the inevitable painful swelling, crystals can also form in the skin tissue causing psoriasis. I have had this in varying degrees, and I can see how it might viewed as eczema.

    Goldman, in “Uric acid in the etiology of psoriasis” writes:

    The potential etiologic relationship between uric acid in its microcrystalline monosodium urate form and psoriasis was examined by 1) substantiating the reported correlation between hyperuricemia and psoriasis using the phosphotungstate method; 2) examining psoriatic tissue samples for the presence of urates under a microscope using polarized light and a compensator; 3) attempting to induce psoriasis-like symptoms in laboratory animals with purine-to-uric acid metabolism by increasing serum uric acid level; and 4) observing psoriasis-hyperuricemic patients following treatment for their hyperuricemia with Allopurinol. As expected, both men and women psoriatics had higher uric acid levels than did their counterparts in a control group. Monosodium urate crystals were found in samples from psoriatic plaques by both methods used. They were clustered particularly around sweat pores and Munro abscesses, but were found only occasionally in epidermal tissue taken from nonpsoriatics. Psoriasis-like symptoms were induced in laboratory animals (the South American boa, Constrictor constrictor) when they were fed doses of uric acid. Patients with psoriasis and hyperuricemia showed marked improvement in psoriasis when treated for their hyperuricemia. Psoriasis, like gout, may be, at least partly, a result of disorder of purine metabolism and monosodium urate crystals may be responsible for the cell proliferation that is characteristic of psoriatic plaques. Monosodium urate crystals were found by the author to be strikingly segmented. This structure may result in ease of fragmentation, thus increasing the difficulty in identifying urates in any tissue.

    #7893
    trev
    Participant

    Welcome to the forum Carol- My experience is that UA reduction can be acheived using natural methods- but only up to so much.

    Changing my BP meds for the combination  of Furosemide and Losaratan has helped as this gives a boost to UA reduction of 1% (or more), according to reliable reports (I think Japan).

    Certainly stopping Bendrofluthiazide was  a good move. No attack for 9 months now! :)

    This is not enough to tip the scales though – so I use Goutcure daily, a herbal mix reputed to be good for everything, and if it is, Good! Also using a probiotic from them.

    The site that supplies this to me Goutcare.co uk also give a fair bit of dietary advice which is helpful, if hard to follow for long. A week is the usual 'full strength' diet run.

    Mainly fruit , veg and water to go with the Goutcure which can be a tad drying I find- but also at the 3 a day -gives me itching!!

    So it may be that the UA going into the blood does this -as urine acid output goes up dramatically.

    Often a reading in am of 5.5- highly acidic. This is night time normal follow up to liver & kidney function.

    So the itching may not be all bad and if you try Goutcure, but be gentle with anything you try- as you may be already helping the situation with your own ministrations.

    You might find a UA monitor helpful if you can't get ready checks on blood and this helps me get on track. Stay below 7mg/dl if you can, though daily variations  are normal.

    If you need meds, then you can read up on here many opinions- but whatever you do, you will need persistence -and a good doctor helps a lot. They generally don't 'get' gout very well ,especially if they don't suffer from it or have direct experience of it, like many lay people, too.

    You will get a SUA test before they will prescribe anything.

    #7886
    odo
    Participant

    The short answer to your question: “how do I do this naturally?” is you don't. Due to the natural process of aging your organs are in a state of slow decline, specifically your kidneys, which are largely responsible for Uric acid clearance, as well as fluid metabolism which affects the nourishment of the skin – hence the itching ( I get it too, mainly on the ankles and shins).

    Standard recommendation on this forum is to first get your UA level measured so that you can establish an understanding of exactly where you are on the gout spectrum. This is a simple blood test. Secondly, do a lot of reading of past posts on here to get yourself up to speed on the knowledge base as far as possible. The advice you will probably get is to start taking the meds, as this is the quickest method of lowering UA levels, and in view of the list of noxious substances you've been prepared to subject your body to in the past, I wonder why you are reluctant to do this.

    There are, however, a few people here who are trying to avoid drug therapy, mostly through diet. But it is a long, slow process of trial and error with only small gains to be made. My personal recommendation would be to give Chinese medicine a try: acupuncture and herbs. This is usually a therapy of last resort for many people, but it can have remarkable results, especially in conjunction with dietary restrictions from both a Western and Chinese perspective. And, of course, it's totally natural and can even run alongside any other meds you might be taking. The only downside is it's not cheap.

    #7880
    trev
    Participant

    I differ on Odos' view on the worthwhileness of natural cures.

    I had two sequential readings of 4.5 whilst on the Goutcure  'blitz' diet and I wouldn't call that a small gain. In fact, if I just stayed around 6, that would be fine for now -without attacks.

    Further the capsules are made up of herbs like Yucca root and others like aged garlic and you recommend a herbal approach yourself- so I don't get where your view is coming from- somewhat contradictory.

    Most meds, in my view, are potentially noxious- but that doesn't mean one can't take them, even as you recommend them here. In fact ,generally -meds tend to acidity in the body from all I've seen and that's not good for gout, in particular.

    Allopurinol does have a predictable therapy value when needed -but I prefer to try other methods while able to do it with reasonable success.

    #7895

    earthmuzk said:

    Gout and itching. I have been itching on my feet and heels for several months. Sometimes all over my body, feet and hands. Recently I had an extreme gout attack. During that time my itching went away and when the attack stopped, the itching came back. I have tried every cream made, including steroids, hydrocortisone and fungal. I am now convinced that the itching is a buildup of uric acid that is huge. I am 62 and for the last few years have been trying to lose wight by eating a high-protein diet. Now, I am trying to following a low protein gout diet, etc. I am beside myself with the itching tho. Just found out about the baking soda and will try that. Any other suggestions. I have tried Atarax, nerve therapy, etc. I think the solution is to rid my body of uric acid. How do I do this naturally?


    Uric acid crystals can certainly get under the skin, causing psoriasis of varying degrees. Everyone has different sensitivity levels, but the truth is, it may be the gout, or it may be something else.

    We can really help with the gout here, and might be able to give pointers to other conditions.

    It is utterly pointless to discuss the merits or otherwise of different cures, until we know your uric acid levels. As much history and information as possible will give us the best chance to help you.

    As odo says, We start with current uric acid levels and I would also like to see recent history. We develop a plan together. We fix your gout. This may or may not fix the itching, but it will definitely fix the gout.

    #7896
    odo
    Participant

    No, don't get me wrong Trev I'm TOTALLY IN FAVOUR OF NATURAL CURES and agree about the toxicity of meds. I was just trying to present a balanced view to a first time poster. Perhaps I slightly overcompensated for my own bias.

    4.5 on the Goutcure diet is impressive, but if it's not sustainable then surely that's just like losing weight by fasting and putting it all back on again when you begin eating normally? What I meant was that gains are achieved in small increments and require real dedication to maintain.

    I am currently taking a couple of Chinese herbal patent formulas, which are keeping me completely clear of gout symptoms (famous last words) despite regularly recording UA levels in the high 6s and my last test was 7.0. (been a bit cavalier with diet lately and stress levels are high coming up to finals & dissertation deadline looming). So, yes, I am all in favour of herbs regardless of which medical tradition they come from.

    That said, I would also not hesitate to start popping naproxen should I feel the need.

    #7897
    odo
    Participant

    GoutPal said:

    As odo says, We start with current uric acid levels and I would also like to see recent history. We develop a plan together. We fix your gout. This may or may not fix the itching, but it will definitely fix the gout.


    Will go out on a limb here and say acupuncture can probably fix the itching Cool

    #7898
    zip2play
    Participant

    High uric acid CAN cause itching directly but it is not likely. BUT indirectly, high uric acid can damage the kidneys and underperforming kidneys can READILY cause itching.

    earthmusck,

    Next doctor visit, when you get your uric acid measured have doc run a liver panel. THe buildup of bilirubin is ALWAYS associated with extreme itching and it is the first marker for liver damage…usually caused by hepatitis. Best to rule out liver problems whenever you suffer long term itching. Is there any yellowing of your skin or eyes?

    #7901
    Utubelite
    Participant

    I have a different experience on itching in the last 7 months that I am taking Allopurinol.

    1. Whenever I have increased the dosage e.g. 150 mg to 200, to 250 and then to 300 mg, I always got itching for couple of days. Few times, it was almost scratching on few spots on skin, which would turn red and then become normal in 2-3 hrs. This is story of my first 6 weeks of Allopurinol.

    2. After I stablized on 300 mg dose almost 5 and half months back, I have seen that every 2-3 weeks, I would experience few heatup sensations in the toe and itching in the skin. I have also taken SUA readings on those days and the SUA levels were on the higher side of my range( Remember my range is 3.2 to 4.8 but on these days, I always got the readings of 4.4 and above upto 4.8)….If I do not include these high itch and sensation days, my SUA levels would be always below 4.

     It has happened at-least 5-6 times, last time it was just a week back. My SUA levels shot up to 4.8….it settled down in 2-3 days. My levels today are 3.6 and 4.0 in the 2 reading I took at home.

    So, I can conclude easily that whenever I have got itching every 2-3 weeks, SUA levels were high and probably reason of the itching….I have no logical reasoning behind it but it is just my personal experience.

    #3679
    Kim Glasgow
    Participant

    Itchy head and eczema from gout?

    I have just had my first experience with a gouty toe about 1.5 months ago. The flare up lasted for about one week. I was surprised that I have gout since I am fairly fit and not heavy…. But I think that my dieting has caused the gout. I am concerned that people say that diet will not affect the gout. I have bought a meter and have been testing my levels. Initially I had a reading of 10.8 and then after managing my diet and not drinking any wine, I have brought my readings down to 4.8 – 6.4 mg/dL.?

    When the readings were higher I had a horrible itchy sensation in the skin of my neck and ears and eyelids. Then I started to get eczema like patches on and under my eyelids and my ears became flaky dry too. Now that the readings are lower these gout symptoms are much better, but not gone completely. Has anyone else gone through this? My friend, who is a veterinarian, says that Dalmatians (who get gout) chew at their skin as if they are itchy when they get it. Is this itchiness a sign that the gout may developed into a tophaceous form with the involvement of the skin. ? Should I seek the help of my Doctor and get treatment instead of self treating?

    So far I am eating a more vegetarian diet, using the gout haters cook books, drinking apple cider vinegar with the mother with a bit of baking soda, and not drinking any beer or wine. My family is furious with me for taking a dietary approach to this… They feel I am being far too picky and fussing too much about a little old gout attack. I admit I want to manage this and not let it become a horribly debilitating aspect of my life. ? Any suggestions?

    #12269
    limpy
    Participant

    Only people that have never had a Gout attack think of it as a little attack. When?I was getting them bad it was some of the worst pain I've ever been in. If they have never been thru it they have no idea. Limpy

    #12270
    Kim Glasgow
    Participant

    Thanks for the empathy. I was very surprised at how painful the toe was and the fact that I couldn't move it at all. I was still able to walk, with a really good shoe on.?

    I am still wondering about whether anyone gets the itchy skin the way I do? I also wonder about whether I should be looking at trying to see a rheumatologist at this early stage of my disease?

    #12271
    Andrew
    Participant

    I find your post intriguing and I will explain why.

    ?

    Background: I've suffered from gout attacks since 2005 and started urate reduction therapy with Allopurinal in February 2011.

    ?

    In December 2010 I started waking up at night finding I was scratching at my beard. Over the nexct couple of months I lost significant patches of my beard (it's called alopecia barbae). My doctor assured me it had nothing to do with gout. Over the next few months the beard grew back, albeit not as coarse or as dark as originally.

    ?

    Fast forward to August 2011. I've been in complete misery since starting Allopurinal in February, with some joint or another in my feet or knees undergoing an acute gout attack. No more than a few days between gout attacks! Additionally, I'm under a lot of stress due to a family illness. (I mean, a LOT of stress). I'm noticing LOTS of hair loss (hairs collecting in the shower drain and on my sweaters). Then I discovered a complete bald spot on the back of my neck. This is called alopecia areata, an autoummune disorder in which the hair follicles are attacked by your own immune system. My doctor continues to assure me this has no connection to the gout. I am not so sure! I've received 2 series of cortisone shots to the scalp to suppress the immune system and stimulate new hair growth. Seems to be working as I have “peach fuzz” growing back (though it lacks any pigment, so this is going to look interesting for a while – the doctor says eventually the ahirs will re-pigment). Since receiving the cortisone treatments, I have noticed a tingling, sometimes itchy, sensation at the back of my neck. I am told this can be either a sign of new hair loss via alopecia mechanism, or due to the growth of new hair. I do notice far less shedding so I assuming it's new hair growth. I hope.

    ?

    Eczema and alopecia are both considered autoimmune disorders. That alone does not prove anything. But, as I said, my curiousity is piqued.

    #12263

    Kim Glasgow said:

    I have just had my first experience with a gouty toe about 1.5 months ago. The flare up lasted for about one week. I was suprised that I have gout since I am fairly fit and not heavy…. But I think that my dieting has caused the gout. I am concerned that people say that diet will not effect the gout. I have bought a meter and have been testing my levels. Initially I had a reading of 10.8 and then after managing my diet and not drinking any wine, I have brought my readings down to 4.8 – 6.4 mg/dl.?

    So far I am eating a more vegetarian diet, using the gout haters cook books, drinking apple cider vinegar with the mother with a bit of baking soda, and not drinking any beer or wine. My family is furious with me for taking a dietary approach to this… They feel I am being far too picky and fussing too much about a little old gout attack. I admit I want to manage this and not let it become a horribly debiliating aspect of my life. ?Any suggestions?


    In my opinion diet does not cause gout – excess uric acid does. OK, diet can affect uric acid, but my distinction is important because it tells you exactly what you must do if you want a successful dietary approach to managing gout.

    You must measure uric acid frequently, and make dietary changes that lower uric acid. I will not dwell on this here, as we are mainly discussing itching and eczema, but you are taking the perfect approach. If you can lower your target to never go above 5mg/dL, you will gain gout freedom. Just be aware that there is more to uric acid control than purines, so please feel free to start other discussions about iron, calories, exercise, etc in the gout diet forum.

    ?

    As for the itchiness and eczema, it is a difficult one to call.

    I have experienced these symptoms, but not at any interval or frequency that I can relate to gout attacks. Analyzing events with respect to uric acid levels would be useful, but hard to make it conclusive with a sample size of one. It may be significant that my itchy experiences were when I was trying to control uric acid through dietary means – maybe some food changes triggered allergic reactions?

    ?

    It seems logical to me that the physical effects of an acute gout attack – soreness and inflammation – might trigger eczema, but I would expect this to be localized around the affected joints. If it is related to tophi forming near the surface of the skin, then I expect this to go away if you maintain uric acid at 5mg/dL.

    ?

    The autoimmune angle introduced by Andrew is an interesting consideration. As the pain of acute gout flares is caused by an immune response to uric acid crystals, then gout must affect other autoimmune disorders. How it affects them, and to what extent, is unknown (at least to me at this time). However if anyone denies the connection, I'd love to read their explanation of why the disorders are not linked. If they think that gout pain is caused by sharp crystals irritating joints, then stamp on their headssurprised.

    If the itching and eczema is gout-related through the immune reaction to uric acid crystals, then you need to be aware of the two entirely different phases that trigger the immune reaction. I call one the bad phase, where uric acid is high, and crystals start to form – usually in one or two isolated locations. The other phase is the good phase, where uric acid is low and crystals start to dissolve – usually more widespread, throughout the body.

    ?

    By maintaining uric acid below 6mg/dL eventually, all old crystals will dissolve, and then the immune system will not be affected by these foreign invaders. I, and any other self-respecting gout adviser, set the upper limit at 5mg/dL to give a safety measure for natural variations. This is particularly important in the early stages as blood uric acid levels can rise naturally if large volumes of deposits start dissolving at the same time. It also gives a safety margin for normal variations through the day.

    ?

    As far as seeking professional medical advice is concerned, this depends entirely on you. If the symptoms are too severe or last too long for you to cope with, then you must see your doctor. This is particularly true if there is a sudden change in frequency or severity. They can be helpful in assessing allergic reactions, assessing risks, and testing other possible causes. Be prepared to spend some time teaching uric acid management techniques, but if that becomes necessary, make sure you charge for it.

    #12275
    drmarclevine
    Participant

    Interesting.? My rheumatologist told me during my last visit that,? in his experience, gout and eczema often show up together.? He did not indicate that one causes the other but did mention that he sees many patients with both.? My eczema is mild but I have noticed that it tends to worsen slightly during gout flares.

    #12277

    Thank you for that contribution, drmarclevine.

    You prompted me to take a quick look at studies on uric acid and eczema. Most studies use the term psoriasis, which appears to be commonly confused with eczema. The exact differences between psoriasis and eczema probably do not matter much in this context, as the studies are inconclusive. Most agree with your rheumatologists view that gout and skin problems are often co-existent. At least one study finds no evidence of association.

    Nothing I have seen so far offers any suggestions of how gout may affect, or be affected by, skin conditions.

    The logical approach is to deal with the gout by lowering uric acid to safe levels, then review the skin problem after several months. If eczema/psoriasis disappears along with the uric acid deposits, then you have your answer. If not, then you have a clear mandate to investigate your skin problems further, and seek other remedies. It is vital, for this approach to work, to keep uric acid to 5mg/dL (0.30mmol/L).Getting it lower than that for a few months will speed the process of dissolving old crystals. Failure to sustain this safe level can make gout worse, so if it is linked to the skin problem, it will likely make that worse too.

    There is quite a lot of information scattered around the forums here and on the main gout site – GoutPal.com. To find it, use the search box at the top of the screen – something like itching OR eczema OR psoriasis will yield a wide scattering of relevant information. If you want me to summarize it all more effectively, follow the guidelines for improving this gout support service (Gout Forums For All).

    #12278
    odo
    Participant

    Andrew said:

    Eczema and alopecia are both considered autoimmune disorders.


    Also, both can be triggered by stress. Repeated gout attacks are very stressful & you mention another very stressful situation in your life which, in addition to its primary stress effects, may also be preventing you from having your own health issues acknowledged, as they are perceived as minor in comparison – adding to your stress levels.

    While a link between gout & other auto immune diseases may be interesting (and a no-brainer imo), I think the stress factors in your life are a more important consideration, which needs adressing urgently. Easier said than done, no doubt, but sometimes you have to let the world know that you need to get your own sh*t together before you can be of any use to anyone else.

    #12279
    hansinnm
    Participant

    odo said:

    Andrew said:

    Eczema and alopecia are both considered autoimmune disorders.


    Also, both can be triggered by stress. Repeated gout attacks are very stressful & you mention another very stressful situation in your life which, in addition to its primary stress effects, may also be preventing you from having your own health issues acknowledged, as they are perceived as minor in comparison – adding to your stress levels.
    While a link between gout & other auto immune diseases may be interesting (and a no-brainer imo), I think the stress factors in your life are a more important consideration, which needs addressing urgently. Easier said than done, no doubt, but sometimes you have to let the world know that you need to get your own sh*t together before you can be of any use to anyone else.


    Keith (Gout Admin)

    It would help enormously if contributors would take a little more responsibility for their own health issues. Do not blame doctors, governments, pharmaceutical companies, food industries, or my screen layouts for your [own] health problems. Learn to ask the right questions and take control of your own gout.

    _____________________________________________________________________________

    Odo, between you, Keith and Zip (I didn't give any quote of his -he got too many- so he may choose his own favorite one), I don't know who more deserves the Nobel Price on GOUT! May all three of you should share it together.wink

    #12280
    Andrew
    Participant

    Thanks very much, but I have my sh*t together. Let's be careful of rushing to judgment here. I've been doing an excellent job of self-care and keeping on top of MY doctors (having learned to do that for my ailing, now deceased, family member). When a loved one is suffering extremely with a terminal illness, it's stressful, period. You can avoid the common pitfalls (like drinking), you get exercise, you eat right, you pray, meditate etc, you talk to support people, you go to a movie — but at the end of the day you've still been through the wringer and you're still exhausted and you're still facing another day of it. Until the loved one is gone, which is no picnic, either. Sometimes the only way out is through, you do the best you can – which is what I did.

    #12281
    odo
    Participant

    Sorry you took my post as a criticism; it wasn't. I was merely trying to point out that when people are plunged into stressfull situations taking care of others, it's easy to forget to take care of yourself. I'm sure you're doing your best.? My main point was that stress is the unifying factor rather than gout. I apologise for any misunderstanding.

    ?

    I've no idea what hansinnm's post was on about. But that's not unusual.confused

    #12288
    Kim Glasgow
    Participant

    Keith (Gout Admin) said:


    As for the itchiness and eczema, it is a difficult one to call.

    If the itching and eczema is gout-related through the immune reaction to uric acid crystals, then you need to be aware of the two entirely different phases that trigger the immune reaction. I call one the bad phase, where uric acid is high, and crystals start to form – usually in one or two isolated locations. The other phase is the good phase, where uric acid is low and crystals start to dissolve – usually more widespread, throughout the body.

    ?

    I have had a couple of very bad days for the itching sensation and my eyelids are starting to become inflammed. I have checked my uric acid levels and have found them to be in the 5's and then up to 6.0 mg/dl. this a.m. ?I wonder if because I had my levels down to 5 for a few days before this rise… if the good phase at this point is causing the itching through “the crystals starting to dissolve – widespread, throughout the body.” I know I was pretty itchy before my first actual gouty toe episode and when that happened the itchyness abated.?

    ?

    #12289
    Andrew
    Participant

    Kim Glasgow said:

    Keith (Gout Admin) said:

    I call one the bad phase, where uric acid is high, and crystals start to form – usually in one or two isolated locations. The other phase is the good phase, where uric acid is low and crystals start to dissolve – usually more widespread, throughout the body.

    ?


    I hope this is not straying too far from the topic a hand, but this is the first time I have seen the distinction made about isolated vs. widespread locations in the two immune reaction phases. When I was in the bad phase, I only had gout attacks in my left big toe. Since March I have been in the good phase (as documented by my uric acid number), and I have had attacks in almost all the toes on my left foot, in my right big toe, multiple attacks in both heels, and most recently, I've had attacks in both knees (one earlier this summer, the other going on currently). I rarely go more than a couple of weeks without an attack. At least my feet have been feeling much better.

    Are these new gout attack locations due to “stealth” deposits of uric acid crystals that would have eventually caused a “bad” gout attack? What's next after my knees? My hips? And then? My UA number is well into the therapeutic levels (has been checked monthly). Is this discussed someplace else in the forum? I'd like to know more.

    #12290
    Al O’Purinol
    Participant

    Andrew said:

    Are these new gout attack locations due to “stealth” deposits of uric acid crystals that would have eventually caused a “bad” gout attack? What's next after my knees? My hips? And then? My UA number is well into the therapeutic levels (has been checked monthly). Is this discussed someplace else in the forum? I'd like to know more.


    I can't remember if it has been fully discussed before, but?gout attacks during treatment for lowering uric acid?is certainly discussed now [link removed – discussion closed]. Please read my explanation of?Lowering Uric Acid: What Are The Pitfalls?, then start a new discussion if necessary.

    #12319

    Curiouser said:

    Urate crystals in the skin are a known symptom – see commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Uric_acid_skin_rash.jpg for what I'm told is an example.?


    Anyone getting health advice (or any other advice) from Wrongipedia is asking for trouble.

    #12329
    zip2play
    Participant

    My “partially baked idea”:

    Psoriasis and Exzema are both autoimmune. Perhaps gout, being a VICIOUS?stimulation?of the immune system to attack urate precipitation might result in overactivity of the immune system in general, resulting in a proclivity to all kinds of auto-immune diseases (like most of the arthritises.)

    ?

    My immune system overreacts HORRIBLY to fungus attacks, insect bites, what have you. I have never before thought of this possible connection to my gout. Hmmm.

    ?

    I am concerned that people say that diet will not effect the gout.

    Let me amplify: I have no doubt that diet can CAUSE gout but once a person has had a single gout attack he can no longer tolerate any instance of a serum uric acid that is supersaturated like normal people can. Once crystals have formed there will ALWAYS remain a focal point for more crystallization.

    Thus, while?diet can CAUSE an initial attack of gout becasue the serum urate got prepoesterously high, there isn't much capability to control the established gout with diet. Once you have had a confirmed certain gout attack, it is time to? start medication. It will not go away and diets won't prevent another attack…and another.

    #12350
    Gilles Corno
    Participant

    I?have both gout and psoriasis. ?My take on it now is that diet can help maintain low uric acid level and surely has a great influence on psoriasis flare ups. ?I've experience low gluten and eliminated animal milks which reduced my psoriasis a lot. ?I have been taking my u.a. Level on a regular basis, 12/48 {12 hours with no food and 48 hours with no alcohol}, always in the morning before bkt, at approx. Same hour, mid of the week or saturday. ?With this my u.a. Level has fluctuated mostly due to stress or being generaly tired from long weeks of work. ?Diet might impact the u.a. Level at that point, stress having been part of my personnality since young age, it sure has been contributory to my goutty condition. ?By slowing down telling myself I have to get my u.a. Down from several weeks of high levels, I can bring down from 450 to 350 in just one week with normal diet, nothing special, restaurant food included.

    I have been taking my u.a. Level for three years now, and it has helped me a lot in understanding my situation. ?Uric acid level is the key for sure. It's difficult to accept uric acid levels because it is telling you what is going wrong if you are willing to listen to it. ?Most of the time, I tend to want to blaim other factors, but I always come to realize that my stress and general condition has to improve to change my situation around.

    This is my own experience which I share?here since I have learn so much here over the years, and would like to give a little back if it can help anyone. ?Keith and everyone involved here have made a tremendous job with this site, it is very hard to do more. ?Hope my little blurp here is o.k.!

    Regards?

    Gilles

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