Keith’s GoutPal Story 2020 Forums Please Help My Gout! Alkaline But Still Gouty

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  • #3057
    dandz
    Participant

    Sorry if this isn't referencing your question, but I've tried everything and can't figure out where in hell to post a new question !!

    I've been engaged in a fierce battle with the gout monster for almost a week now, and think i have him on the run finally.  He started with my left middle finger, then progressed to others joints in the hand and partially into my wrist. Then it got too ambitious and went after my right ankle before it had even exited the hand. I knew it was in trouble then.       Well, a rigid defense compossed of frequent doses of baking soda, celery seed tea, apple cider vinegar and exclusively alkaline and low purine foods drove its feeble advance completely out of my right ankle yesterday, while driving both my urine and saliva PH way up to around 7.5 or more.  However, he is still hunkered down in my hand, alternating between several fingers. And it doesn't just feel like residual inflamation, but a definite presence.

    My questiion is:  If I am that alkaline, why is he still here? Or could that be a false PH reading I'm getting, where the body is buffering an actual acidic condition. But there is no odor of ammonia at all, so can it be dumping calcium instead? Is that possible ? I even indulged in a couple of beers tonight and my urine is still highly alkaline!

    #6422

    dandz said:

    Sorry if this isn't referencing your question, but I've tried everything and can't figure out where in hell to post a new question !!


    I'm not ususually too bothered where you post, but I managed to move this to a new topic in time (once people start answering, then I can't move a “off-topic” discussion).

    For future questions, and to any other newcomers reading this, Each forum has a “New Topic” button and link. There are also “Start New Discussion” links in the Forum Guidelines, which I strongly recommend reading before you post. If this sounds a bit draconian, I don't mean it to be. I simply want everyone to get the most out of the forum, and like any forum, a little preparation, planning and targeting will always get you the best responses.

    I will be back to answer your question more fully soon, but the short answer is: body pH, measured either by urine or saliva, has almost nothing to do with uric acid. Alkalizing the urine will make uric acid more soluble and help avoid kidney stones but it will do little else for gout management.

    You must, absolutely must, and at the risk of repetition, definitely must, measure your uric acid number. Depending on that value, and your gout history, you might be able to control your uric acid through diet and lifestyle.

    Report back with your uric acid number, and we can help you better.

    #17281
    Benny
    Guest

    Keith,

    I think you are wrong, and on an epically big proportion. Urine ph, has a massive effect on uric acid levels over the long run. And I think both you, and the doctors with whom you seem to align your trust so closely have completely missed the boat. It takes time for the ph to equilibrate across the body (I can’t go into detail here… it takes a book! Try one!)

    I saw some comments a while back where you were advising a young athletic guy to cut back gym sessions – these things would only make his gout inflammations worse, you said. Again – you miss what our learned athletic friend knows at a base level…

    It is a lack of athletics and too many toxins that cause this disease. The fact is, you up the exercise, and try to rid your body of toxin and it may cause an attack. That is the body’s response mechanism!

    Keith, you say that you have tried all the tricks in the book (alternatives) but from your picture profile, it’s frankly clear that you have not.

    I would advise any gout sufferer to seek out alternative therapies. I, personally have cured my gout through weight loss, cherry, celery, cayenne, Co-enyyme … (a few other things too)…, plenty of distilled water and plenty of sweat-induced exercise (I wear a sweat-suit).

    I highly suspect that if you – Keith – took this thing half as seriously as I do, then you’d be able to kick your gout too!

    In a game of tennis, you don’t look at the scorecard. You play the ball! Looking at your uric acid levels is playing the scorecard… It’s time to start playing the ball.

    And that is, treat the problem, not the symptom!

    If Keith is so kind as to keep my post up here, then I only hope readers will go out and find their own cures… as I did. Then come back here and tell us all about them.

    Exercise, positive will power, and an open mind… give it a try and see what you can do. Don’t give in to the crazy quacks and all that follow blindly!

    Benny

    #17300
    Keith Taylor
    Participant

    Hey, @dandz I’m hoping you are still around from 5 years ago, as I need to correct my answer. At the time, I thought that alkalizing diets were only relevant to reducing the risk of kidney stones. If you have been following my progress over the last few years, you will know that I now advocate an alkalizing diet as a positive measure for long term reduction of uric acid.

    My original answer:

    I will be back to answer your question more fully soon, but the short answer is: body pH, measured either by urine or saliva, has almost nothing to do with uric acid. Alkalizing the urine will make uric acid more soluble and help avoid kidney stones but it will do little else for gout management.

    You must, absolutely must, and at the risk of repetition, definitely must, measure your uric acid number. Depending on that value, and your gout history, you might be able to control your uric acid through diet and lifestyle.

    Report back with your uric acid number, and we can help you better.

    I’d like to revise that answer.

    First of all, congratulations on achieving a urine pH of 7.5. This is the only measure that counts, as it relates directly to the acid load on your kidneys. Purists might argue that other medical factors are relevant, but these relate to chronic conditions that are beyond the scope of normal gout control in otherwise healthy individuals. My only concern is that some of this is achieved with baking soda. I’m aware that baking soda is associated with increased blood pressure. I’m not aware of associated long term health risks of chemically altering pH levels. However, personally, I prefer to improve pH with natural foods rather than chemical supplements.

    Alkalizing the urine will make uric acid more soluble and help avoid kidney stones. It will also encourage reduction in uric acid levels. However, as with all interventions that lower uric acid, it is important to measure the response, so you must monitor uric acid levels.

    This is best done by arranging blood tests at your doctor, when you can also check iron levels which have an influence on gout. For some people, a uric acid test kit helps, but you need to be able to adopt a meticulous approach to testing.

    @dandz if you have recent uric acid test results, please share them. If not, please let me know if you prefer to get uric acid tests with your doctor or at home. It would be best to record your results and preferences in your profile ( https://gout-pal.com/users/dandz/profile/ ), then simply post here that you have updated your profile. When I have that information, I hope I can offer more personal help.

    #17301
    Keith Taylor
    Participant

    By the way, @dandz I forgot to mention my Alkalizing Gout Diet Menu pages that start at http://www.goutpal.com/gout-diet/gout-diet-menu/

    I’m constantly trying to improve these, so if you have any suggestions for better information, I look forward to reading your ideas. Of course, that invitation extends to anyone else who is interested in alkaline diets for gout. The invitation even includes ‘Benny’ but only if you can refrain from personal jibes.

    Of course, dandz’s question still remains: how can gout continue if we have succeeded in alkalizing the kidney load? The answer is simple from a general gout management perspective, but difficult from a personal gout control perspective.

    Simply put, there are many other factors that influence uric acid levels in the blood, besides urine pH. Even if those factors do not apply, it takes many months for old uric acid crystals to dissolve. I usually refer to this as the debulking phase of gout treatment.

    So, your personal questions start with your current uric acid level. Is it low enough, or do you need more interventions to make uric acid safe? If it is low enough, how will you deal with the risk of inflammation from the gout monster in the debulking phase? With personal gout facts and a logical approach, dealing with the gout monster is just a matter of time.

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